Commitment Checklist

Continuing from an earlier post on Borrowed Advice and inspired by a heartbreaking piece I came up with a tentative checklist on questions to ask oneself before going in for a lifelong commitment:

  • Will I still love you when you are too tired for a movie but not a booze party?
  • Will I still love you when you catch a cold and demand 24-hr nursing care?
  • Will I still love you when you insist on trekking with an 11-month baby?
  • Will I still love you when your job is more important than mine?
  • Will I still love you when you have eyes only for your phone screen?
  • Will I still love you when your family is my family but mine is not yours?
  • Will I still love you when you are sullen, surly, cranky, moody, and grouchy?
  • Will I still love you when you are bald and fat?
  • Will I still love you when you break my heart over and over again?
  • Will I love you still?
  • Will I?

Thanks for reading. Feel free to add your own questions…

WPC: An Orderly Lot

With so much of disorder and chaos all around wouldn’t it be great if there was a genie or a magic wand to order everything to fall into an orderly pattern? Ah well I guess I am asking for too much. But one can dream and hope can’t one?

Until it happens, here are some photos for inspiration.

CargoOf they go in tandem and in sync, not a step wheel out of place –  and nobody jumps queue either 😉

PanelingUneven strips of stone have been coaxed into a neat orderly pattern

TreesEven Nature falls in line just to show you the way…

HedgeAnd allows herself to be ruthlessly trimmed into a shapely order.

IMAGE_259Buildings are usually made to order – be they for elephants

IMAGE_261Or their mahouts.

BanglesBangles for the bride are always in order – packed or worn. Quite in contrast to her life that is thrown into disorder.

ShoesGo on, choose one 😉

ThreadsHere diverse threads and colors have been coerced into order by our very own Svkuki

RangoliWhile here, an unruly bunch of multi-colored petals have been tricked to give an orderly appearance by none other than the wayward and absconding Mymind ;).

Thanks for visiting – have a great day 🙂

 

 

WPC: What’s Your Choice?

Which do you prefer – the sunrise with its promise of a new day, signalling a new hope or the sunset the welcome end of a satisfying day’s work, the knowledge that you did your best?

puriBut whether it is the sunrise or the

Sunsetthe sunset, both are evanescent or fleeting moments gone in the blink of an eye. Not unlike our lives.

between

sunrise and sunset

our lives

to squander or make it last

forever

Righting a Wrong

The bar door swung open and she automatically turned around.

She paled under the heavy make up and instantly turned her back to him.

What was he doing here? When had he gotten out of jail? And of all the places why come here? Had he come looking for her? Hadn’t she hidden her tracks well enough?

She slipped on her over large dark glasses and fluffed her blonde wig. She wondered if she could slip out before he…

“Hello Gorgeous.” He loomed behind her.

She froze.

“Let me buy you a drink.” His voice was low, seductive.

He hadn’t recognized her!

“No thanks,” she mumbled.

“Just one drink Baby,” He leered at her

Shuddering she jerked her arm away.

He caught hold of her arm. “Don’t act so pricey!”

Blood rushed to her head. Enough was enough. She knew how to handle unwanted customers.

She turned back to the counter. “Drink is on me.” She signaled the bartender.

“Cool.” He ran a finger down her bare arm.

Her wavering resolution firmed.

Instead of the usual one tablet, she dropped five tablets into his drink.

Nobody paid any attention to his slumped body or her when she left the bar.

Tears of regret streamed down her cheeks.

If only she had taken the doctor’s advice and opted for the abortion 22 years ago.

***

Linked to the Daily Post’s prompt notorious.  Thanks for reading and for leaving me a note.

WPC: Some More Reflections

Rifling through my archives I found a few more where the photo changed my perspective of what I had intended to capture. This is my second submission to the Weekly Photo Challenge – Reflecting. The first one is here.

Family sunI was trying to capture the Sun in the sky and look what I got – a family’s day out on the beach 🙂

PillarsA (tiny) bit wiser, I actually tried to ‘compose’ a shot – probably my first ever. It’s unedited, nope not even cropped. What do you think – did it work?

ColumbusI have to confess I liked the boat more than its reflection. But the greenery is nicely reflected in the water isn’t it?

PeacockMy entire focus was on the peacock but the glass door reflection is just as eye catching don’t you think?

AirportLook! Diamonds on the floor 😀

Thanks for visiting – any favorites, comments, suggestions?

Reflecting on Nature

April

There are some beautiful trees around the campus where we stay. And on the rare occasions that I do overcome my (overwhelming) laziness I invariably manage to find new trees to drool over. This one is my latest favorite. I couldn’t help marveling at her impoverished state and yet she was so generous in her support to the others. Creepers grew on and around her with impunity whilst she held up her bare arms, undeterred, patient and waiting for her time in the Sun.

She looked so sure that I clicked a photo and waited (impatiently) for what was to unfold in less than a month. Take a look at nature’s miracle in less than a month 🙂

For best results scroll down slowly –

May“I must be willing to give up what I am in order to become what I will be.” Albert Einstein

This is the Amaltas or Cassia fistula and aka golden rain tree that is native to the Indian subcontinent.

Linked to the Weekly Photo Challenge – Reflecting

The Test

The air was thick with excitement and stifled giggles. The prospective groom, Ranjit had arrived with his family to see Juhi, the eldest daughter of the house.

“He’s so handsome!” gushed her friends as they peered from the doorway and ran back to report to Juhi who sat demurely inside, waiting to be summoned.

Juhi adjusted her flowing dupatta and flicked back her long plait. “And he is a doctor,” she couldn’t help boasting.

“Doctor, my foot,” sneered Reeta, “he’s just a compounder. All he does is dispense medicines.”

“Rubbish!” Juhi’s sister was up in arms, “He is a doctor. We went to his clinic. There was a huge queue of patients.”

“He may call himself a doctor but I know the truth.” Reeta shot back.

“What truth?”

“That he is only a registered medical practitioner – an RMP, not a doctor.”

“It’s the same thing.”

“That’s what you think.”

“You are just jealous.”

“Why would I be jealous?” Reeta retorted. “I am going to marry a ‘real’ doctor in the city, not some remote village which doesn’t even have electricity.”

“It does have…”

“Juhi!” Her mother came bustling in trembling with excitement and nervousness, “come along. They want to see you. Now behave yourself. Keep your head down. Don’t forget to touch their feet. Speak but only when spoken to and speak softly….”

She led Juhi out, muttering instructions.

“What is your name?” The elderly man with the big mustache asked.

“Juhi.” Her voice was barely audible.

“Can you cook? And sew?”

Juhi inclined her head.

“Have you been to school?”

“Yes, I studied till Class 5.”

“Did you just go to school or can you also read and write?”

Juhi’s eyes flew up to meet Ranjit’s mocking eyes.

“I can.” She said.

“Which? Read or write?” He smirked. “Don’t mind but I am the only doctor in the entire village. I have a certain standard to live up to. My wife cannot be illiterate…”

“I can read and write.” She asserted.

He pushed forward a notepad. “How about a little test?”

She looked at her mother, who nodded encouragingly. “I know only Hindi.” She said.

“Don’t worry. I don’t have such high expectations!” They laughed.

Ranjit began the dictation.

Juhi bent her head and laboriously wrote them down with her tongue sticking out from one corner of her mouth.

After the dictation was over, everyone held their collective breaths as he scanned the notebook.

After an eon, he lifted his head and smiled. “She passed the test.” He looked at his father. “We may put her on the shortlist…”

“Wait a minute,” Juhi spoke up, ignoring the gasps, “I want you to also take the test.”

“Me?”

“Yes.” She looked at him in the eye. “Please take down my dictation.”

He went red. He looked at his father for guidance and support in dealing with the unheard of insult.

Her mother nudged her. “Juhi! Apologize this very instant.”

But the groom’s father laughed and slapped him on the back. “Go ahead son and show her who you are – a respected and highly educated doctor.

Ranjit gave in and accepted the challenge. But not before his eyes had burned into hers, promising retribution.

“Please check it, Madamji.” He said mockingly as he handed the diary back to her after the dictation was done. “Happy?” He turned to his father and declared, “I like her spirit. Can we finalize her?”

“You may.” Juhi spoke up. Her eyes were glittering. “But I refuse to marry you.”

There was pin drop silence.

She held up the diary. “He failed the test.”

***

Written for the Daily Post’s one word prompt – Better

A/N This story was inspired by a incident reported in the news last week. Hats off to her.