WPC: Amazing Grace

The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge is all about being graceful and dance is all about grace. India is a treasure house of dances ranging from regional folk dances to classical dances. As a child I was fascinated with the classical dance forms. I learned a bit of Bharatnatyam and even had the opportunity to give a stage performance in a school competition – mostly because there was no other taker from our house πŸ˜‰ But I will have you know that I stood second πŸ˜€ No there weren’t two competitors (as my dear brother who was late for the performance suggested) – there were five. Yeah and I was just as incredulous as you but what stands out most in my memory is that my dance teacher said that she wasn’t surprised. A lovely cherished memory! There are other memories too associated with that day but perhaps another day, another challenge πŸ˜‰

As far as grace is concerned, of all the classical Indian dance forms, I have to confess that I personally find the Odissi dance form to be the most graceful. Odissi is a major ancient Indian classical dance that originated in the Hindu temples of Odisha, an eastern coastal state of India. Here are a couple of my beautiful and graceful friend’s photo – I have shared these before but I couldn’t resist posting them again.

handmudra1Isn’t she stunning?

grace
Odissi dancers

So who’s is your favorite?

For readers of Moonshine, here's Chapter 116 AND for IPK fans/readers of SS here's the first part of A Tangled Web

 

 

Published by

Dahlia

Email me at mysilverstreaks@gmail.com or tweet me @mysilverstreaks

36 thoughts on “WPC: Amazing Grace”

  1. OH sΓ¬!!!!! queste ragazze sono un vero incanto, esprimono a meraviglia la grazia e l’eleganza innata di movimento morbidi e molto sensuali….io le scelgo tutte! davvvero hai reso meraviglioso questi colori e movimenti
    benritrovata amica Annalisa

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The comment box did not work for Moonshine, so I wanted to post here and thank you for it. It is interesting that the potential groom is so candid with Rajani, but also a little unfair that the words spoken on the first meeting hold so much weight and every word, touch, look is later dissected and analysed. Also, Rajani is being a bit pig headed for ignoring a as-far-as-we-know good Harry.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Anna for taking the pains to leave a comment despite the issue (will check it out) – the effort and the feedback means a lot to me. And for noticing the very points I wanted to highlight. Every gesture, every word is put under the scanner, analyzed, hashed and rehashed to death – which just complicates the situation I feel. Secondly Rajani is being pig-headed or perhaps, this is her (subconscious?) way of getting back at her parents and avoid taking responsibility. Do as they say for then no blame can be laid at her door… Thanks Anna πŸ™‚

      Like

      1. Yes, but not taking responsibility is a childhood affliction. Her parents never treated her as a thinking, feeling being but only as a daughter and protected or controlled her to the extent that today she is incapable of executing and taking responsibility. She easily caved into their desire to marry her, but now does not taking responsibility and ownership of her word and decision.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yes well noted Anna – young girls lead such sheltered lives where each and every decision is taken by parents. And then what suddenly she is thrown off into the big bad world. Clueless, she ends up either listening to her in-laws or her parents without having any idea who she is and what she wants. She likes to cling to idea of being a ‘good’ girl with flashes of rebellion which more often than not ends up backfiring…

        Like

      3. Also, sometimes I think that the character is living in the last century. Are families still so backward and restrictive today in the smaller towns?

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Unfortunately yes – and not just in smaller towns. In fact sometimes I think regressive mentality is more rampant in bigger cities and affluent societies. In fact in Aamir Khan’s popular TV Sunday series (i forget the name now) the statistics showed that girl child abortion was more common in the upper middle class and educated families.

        Like

Go on - express yourself!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s